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Seder Plate

Seder Plate

Untitled

Neil Goldberg (American, b. 1963)
New York, United States, 1996
  • Matzah and paper in epoxy resin and wheels
  • Height: 5 in. (12.7 cm) Diameter: 12 1/4 in. (31.1 cm)
  • The Jewish Museum, New York
  • Purchase: Judaica Acquisitions Fund, 1998-44
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Seder Plate

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A special plate is traditionally used to hold the symbolic foods eaten at the Passover seder. The seder plate generally includes designated spots for the egg, roasted shank bone, green vegetable, bitter herb, and haroset (a sweet mixture of fruits, nuts, and wine).

Encouraging children to ask questions is an essential part of the Passover seder. In this spirit, Neil Goldberg visited six Jewish day schools of different denominations and invited children to write down their questions about God. He then reprinted these questions in spirals to form the placeholders for the traditional items on the seder plate.

Goldberg's seder plate is made from a real matzah mounted on four wheels. This matzah-on-wheels suggests the haste with which the Israelites left Egypt in biblical times. The spiraling questions reflect the universal urge to question and discover God, while also acknowledging the diversity that exists within modern Judaism.