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Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade

Weegee (born Arthur Fellig) (American, b. Poland, 1899-1968)

Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade, c. 1940

  • Gelatin silver print
  • 14 3/4 x 18 7/8 in. (37.5 x 48 cm)
  • The Jewish Museum, New York
  • Purchase: Joan B. and Richard L. Barovick Family Foundation and Bunny and Jim Weinberg Gifts, 2000-72
  • © Weegee/International Center of Photography/Getty Images

Not on view

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Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade

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Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade

CLOSE LOOKING / VISUAL ANALYSIS:

Encourage students to examine Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade carefully

  • Describe the mood of this photograph. How has the artist created this mood?

  • How would you describe the expression of the man in this photograph? What effect does the use of light have on the impact of the photograph? What about the placement of the figure within the frame of the photo? What did the photographer choose to leave out of the photograph?

  • What clues does the photographer include about the time and place of the photograph?




FOR FURTHER DISCUSSION:

After giving students ample opportunity to examine Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade, lead them in a discussion of related topics and themes:

  • What story could you tell about this man? Where do you think he is coming from? Where do you think he is going? What do you think he is thinking?

  • This photograph was taken on New York’s Lower East Side, a popular neighborhood among Eastern European Jewish immigrants in the early 20th century. Why do you think immigrants often choose to live in the same neighborhoods as other immigrants? What are the pros and cons, for an immigrant, of moving into an "immigrant" neighborhood?

  • By the time this photograph was taken, many Jewish immigrants (or their families) had moved away from the Lower East Side. Why might they have left?




RESEARCH TOPICS / CONTENT CONNECTIONS

  • The Lower East Side
  • Immigrant Communities
  • Photography