Skip Navigation

Visual AnalysisShare

Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade

Weegee (born Arthur Fellig) (American, b. Poland, 1899-1968)

Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade, c. 1940

  • Gelatin silver print
  • 14 3/4 x 18 7/8 in. (37.5 x 48 cm)
  • The Jewish Museum, New York
  • Purchase: Joan B. and Richard L. Barovick Family Foundation and Bunny and Jim Weinberg Gifts, 2000-72
  • © Weegee/International Center of Photography/Getty Images

Not on view

largeImage

close

Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade

close

Max Is Rushing in the Bagels to a Restaurant on Second Avenue for the Morning Trade

   
A figure emerges out of the pre-dawn darkness. With his pale coat and white apron illuminated by the stark flash of Weegee’s flash bulb, the man contrasts with the dark, velvety tones of the surrounding urban space. Weegee has placed this figure at the lower left corner of the frame. In the background, one can just make out the contours of the buildings lining the street down which Max is walking. The man is caught mid-stride, and his pace seems fairly quick. He looks straight at Weegee—or at the viewer—and one gets the feeling that a moment or two later, Max must have brushed left shoulders with the photographer as he whisked on by to his delivery site. In the background is the silhouette of a tall street lamp. The viewer can tell that this street lamp is at some distance, but within the pictorial space, it is almost directly above Max. The decorative curves of this lamp (known as a bishop’s crook) echo the more prosaic curves of the looped bagel bundles that Max carries.