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EXHIBITION AND PROGRAM LISTINGS - FEBRUARY, MARCH, APRIL 2009Share

Press Contacts:
Anne Scher/Alex Wittenberg
The Jewish Museum
212.423.3271
pressoffice@thejm.org

EXHIBITION AND PROGRAM LISTINGS
FEBRUARY, MARCH, APRIL 2009


EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: This release contains information covering the three month period of February through April 2009. This will be the final version of this release sent by regular mail. If you would like to receive future news releases from The Jewish Museum please send your e-mail address to pressoffice@thejm.org. You can also view current and past press releases on our online press room at www.thejewishmuseum.org/pressroom. For images and additional press materials, please contact the Communications Office at 212.423.3271 or pressoffice@thejm.org. The Jewish Museum's galleries, shops and café will be closed on April 9, 10, 15 and 16 in observance of Passover.


NEW EXHIBITIONS

RECLAIMED: PAINTINGS FROM THE COLLECTION OF JACQUES GOUDSTIKKER

March 15 through August 2, 2009

PRESS PREVIEW
Tuesday, March 10
10 am – 1 pm
REMARKS AT 11 AM


The Jewish Museum will present an exhibition of rarely-seen Old Master paintings entitled Reclaimed: Paintings from the Collection of Jacques Goudstikker from March 15 through August 2, 2009. Reclaimed reveals the extraordinary legacy of Jacques Goudstikker, a preeminent Jewish art dealer in Amsterdam, whose vast collection of masterpieces fell victim, and was almost lost forever, to the Nazi practice of looting cultural properties. In 2006, after years of working with a team of art historians and legal experts, Goudstikker’s family successfully reclaimed 200 of his paintings from the Dutch government – one of the largest claims to Nazi-looted art ever resolved. Featuring 40 of the finest examples of the recovered art, along with original documents and photographs, the exhibition reveals Goudstikker’s influence as a collector, art dealer, tastemaker and impresario; and celebrates the historic restitution of the artworks to the rightful heir. Ten of the paintings on view have never been exhibited in North America before. Also included are 20 original documents and photographs relating to Goudstikker’s life – most significantly, a notebook inventorying his gallery’s holdings.


THE DANUBE EXODUS: THE RIPPLING CURRENTS OF THE RIVER, BY PÉTER FORGÁCS AND THE LABYRINTH PROJECT
March 15 through August 2, 2009

PRESS PREVIEW
Tuesday, March 10
10 am – 1 pm


The Danube Exodus: The Rippling Currents of the River, by Peter Forgács and The Labyrinth Project is a video installation - a collaboration between one of Europe's best-known filmmakers and The Labyrinth Project at the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts - built around original 8-mm film shot by Captain Nándor Andrásovits, an amateur filmmaker who ferried fleeing refugees to safety along the Danube River during World War II. The installation, which grew out of a film by Forgács, immerses visitors in three interwoven historical narratives which they access with a touch screen computer and see on five large screens. One narrative tells of Jews trying to escape Nazi persecution in 1939 by reaching a ship on the Black Sea bound for Palestine. The second story focuses on émigré German farmers after the 1940 Soviet re-annexation of Bessarabia. They abandoned their adopted homes to return to the "safety" of the Third Reich, but instead were relocated to occupied Poland. Captain Andrásovits and the river are the subjects of the third story. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with Extremely Hungary, a yearlong festival showcasing contemporary Hungarian visual, performing, and literary arts. The Danube Exodus: The Rippling Currents of the River, by Peter Forgács and The Labyrinth Project will be on view Sunday through Thursday.


NEW MEDIA CENTER EXHIBITION

MARY KOSZMARY (NIGHTMARES): A FILM BY YAEL BARTANA

February 17 through June 28, 2009

Yael Bartana’s 10 minute, 50 second film Mary Koszmary (Nightmares) explores a complicated set of social and political relationships among Jews, Poles, and other Europeans in the age of globalization. Using the structure and sensibility of a World War II propaganda film, Mary Koszmary addresses contemporary anti-Semitism and xenophobia in Poland, a longing for the Jewish past among liberal Polish intellectuals, a desire among a new generation of Poles to be fully accepted as Europeans, and questions the Zionist dream of return to Israel. In the film, a clean-cut young man delivers a speech in Warsaw’s dilapidated Olympic Stadium to a small troop of young, patriotic scouts bearing Polish flags. He provocatively states, “Let the three million Jews that Poland has missed…chase away the demons. Return to Poland, to your country!” Bartana, an Israeli artist living in Tel Aviv and Amsterdam, stresses the commonalities between contemporary Israel and Poland. She states that in both countries “…there are a small percentage of intellectuals, and a small Left. Both we and they are nations living with the trauma of the past and constantly struggling with the search for identity and definition.”


CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

CHAGALL AND THE ARTISTS OF THE RUSSIAN JEWISH THEATER, 1919-1949

Through March 22, 2009

During the artistic ferment following the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, Marc Chagall and other artists joined actors, choreographers, writers, and musicians in creating a daring new theater. This collaboration gave rise to extraordinary productions with highly original stage designs that redefined the concept of theater itself, attracting large, diverse audiences and garnering international critical praise. In this exhibition, The Jewish Museum sheds light on a little-known and tumultuous story of a vanguard artistic flowering, represented by the Yiddish-speaking company GOSET and Hebrew-speaking Habima, which thrived on the stage for thirty years before being brutally extinguished during the Stalinist era. More than 200 works of art and ephemera, the majority never before exhibited, have been drawn from collections in Russia, France, Israel, and the United States. Marc Chagall’s celebrated, monumental murals are featured, in addition to more than 100 watercolor, gouache and crayon drawings of costume and set designs, executed in the experimental modes of Cubism, Futurism, and Constructivism by such artists as Natan Altman, Robert Falk, Ignaty Nivinsky, Isaac Rabinovich, and Alexander Tyshler. Rare film footage of early performances transports viewers back to another time. Fascinating archival materials such as music, posters, prints, programs and period photographs of productions and actors in character help recapture extraordinary moments. Many items in the exhibition survived a 1953 blaze at Moscow’s Bakhrushkin State Central Theater Museum, the premier repository for archives of the Moscow State Yiddish Theater (GOSET) and a major lender to the exhibition. The fire, almost certainly intentional, was an attempt by the Soviets to stamp out the legacy of the Russian Jewish theater. Following its New York City showing at The Jewish Museum, this exhibition will be on view at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, from April 23 through September 8, 2009.


THE HANUKKAH PROJECT: THE SOUND OF LIGHT BY JULIANNE SWARTZ
Through March 1, 2009

Presented biennially, The Hanukkah Project celebrates Hanukkah with works of art by leading contemporary artists. The Sound of Light is an interactive installation by Julianne Swartz that guides visitors to eight listening locations throughout the Museum’s permanent exhibition, Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey. This site-specific work is inspired by the Hanukkah story, exploring the theme of light cutting through darkness, both visually and aurally. The Sound of Light is on view Sunday through Thursday.


CHILDREN'S EXHIBITION

ARCHAEOLOGY ZONE: DISCOVERING TREASURES FROM PLAYGROUNDS TO PALACES


In Archaeology Zone: Discovering Treasures from Playgrounds to Palaces, an engaging and thoroughly interactive experience, children become archaeologists as they search for clues about ancient and modern objects. Visitors can discover what happens after archaeologists unearth artifacts and bring them back to their labs for in-depth analysis. Children ages 3 through 10 magnify, sketch and weigh objects from the past and the present, piece together clay fragments, interpret symbols, and dress in costumes. By examining these artifacts and imagining how people used these objects in their daily lives, children learn how forms have changed and evolved over time, and how these objects relate to their own lives. Archaeology Zone: Discovering Treasures from Playgrounds to Palacesis on view Sunday through Thursday.


MEDIA CENTER

THE BARBARA AND E. ROBERT GOODKIND MEDIA CENTER


The Barbara and E. Robert Goodkind Media Center features an exhibition space dedicated to video and new media, and houses a digital library of 100 radio and television programs from The Jewish Museum’s National Jewish Archive of Broadcasting (NJAB). Selections include such comedy favorites as “How to Be a Jewish Son,” a panel discussion from a 1970 David Susskind Show featuring the incomparable Mel Brooks; a 1947 radio drama entitled “Operation Nightmare” starring John Garfield and Al Jolson, produced by the United Jewish Appeal to call attention to displaced persons in postwar Europe; contemporary television documentaries on black-Jewish relations, Latino Jews, Jewish feminism, and klezmer music; interviews with artists such as Marc Chagall, Jacques Lipchitz, Larry Rivers, George Segal and Ben Shahn; and Manischewitz wine commercials produced between 1963 and 1981 featuring Sammy Davis, Jr. and Peter Lawford.


PERMANENT EXHIBITION

CULTURE AND CONTINUITY: THE JEWISH JOURNEY


A focused installation, “Theaters of Memory: Art and the Holocaust,” including George Segal's monumental sculpture The Holocaust, 1982, is on view in the contemporary gallery of Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey. Segal's full-scale study for the monument (located in San Francisco's Lincoln Park) is in the collection of The Jewish Museum. The artist's work has become an icon not only of art about the Holocaust but also a work of art intimately associated with the Museum. Also on display are a group of works drawn from the collection – painting, sculpture and video – by Eleanor Antin, Christian Boltanski, Tadeusz Kantor, Anselm Kiefer, Fabio Mauri and Frederic Matys Thursz, with one loan: Naomie Kremer’s 2008 Dictionary.

This vibrant, two-floor exhibition examines the Jewish experience as it has evolved from antiquity to the present over 4,000 years. Visitors to the 4th floor see the Ancient World galleries, featuring archaeological objects representing Jewish life in Israel and the Mediterranean region from 1200 BCE to 640 CE, and a dazzling installation of selections from the Museum’s renowned collection of Hanukkah lamps. On the 3rd floor alone close to 400 works from the 16th century to the present are now on view in this dramatic and evocative experience.

Other highlights of Culture and Continuity include: a pair of silver Torah finials from Breslau, Germany (1792-93) reunited at The Jewish Museum after sixty years of separation; paintings by such artists as Max Weber, Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, Isidor Kaufmann, Morris Louis, and Ken Aptekar; prints by Marc Chagall and El Lissitzky; and sculpture by Elie Nadelman. A display of 38 Torah ornaments allows the viewer to compare artistic styles from different parts of the world. It features lavishly decorated Torah crowns, pointers, finials and shields from Afghanistan, Algeria, Austria, England, France, Germany, Holland, Hungary, Ottoman Empire (Greece and Turkey), Georgia (of the former Soviet Union), Morocco, Israel, Italy, early 20th century Palestine, Persia, Poland, Russia, Tunisia, the United States, and Yemen. Television excerpts from the Museum’s National Jewish Archive of Broadcasting are also included. The entire exhibition is comprised of close to 800 works and is accompanied by a series of thematic, random access audio guides using MP3 technology, including a Director’s Highlights Tour with The Jewish Museum’s Director Joan Rosenbaum and WNYC Radio’s Brian Lehrer.

The portraits of the Levy-Franks family, attributed to Gerardus Duyckinck and dating from the 1720s to 1735, are the most extensive surviving group of Colonial American portraiture. The Jewish Museum is exhibiting six of them consecutively in pairs through June 2009 in Culture and Continuity. The final and third pair is currently on view. These six paintings are from the collection of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, a new museum scheduled to open in 2010. Spanning three generations, the works depict the German-born patriarch Moses Raphael Levy, his wife Grace Mears Levy, his daughter Abigaill Franks and her husband Jacob Franks, and five of their children. These paintings also hold a noteworthy place in American art as one of the oldest surviving family portrait series.

A recently acquired suite of classic post-World War II works originally designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson and the prominent Abstract Expressionist sculptor Ibram Lassaw for Congregation Kneses Tifereth Israel in Port Chester, New York, is also on view in Culture and Continuity. Included are sections of a large wall sculpture/bimah screen, the eternal lamp, the Torah ark, and two of the four bimah chairs.


PUBLIC PROGRAMS


Lecture
THE CONE SISTERS OF BALTIMORE: AN EYE FOR THE AVANT-GARDE
Nancy Hirschland Ramage

Thursday, March 5
6:30 pm

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 students/over 65; $10 Jewish Museum members


Lecture
THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF MEMORY
Péter Forgács

Wednesday, March 18
6:30 pm

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 students/over 65; $10 Jewish Museum members


Panel Discussion
RECLAIMING THE JACQUES GOUDSTIKKER COLLECTION
Monica Dugot, Charlène von Saher, Lawrence M. Kaye; Moderator: Lynn Nicholas

Thursday, March 19
6:30 pm

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 students/over 65; $10 Jewish Museum members


Daytime Lectures
A CLOSER LOOK: THE JACQUES GOUDSTIKKER COLLECTION
Thursdays, March 19, March 26, and April 2
11:30 am

Session I
Peter Sutton

Session II - Opportunism and the German Occupation: Alois Miedl and Han van Meegeren at the Goudstikker Gallery
Jonathan Lopez

Session III - A Family’s Quest: Goudstikker Family Members Speak with Curator Karen Levitov
Marei von Saher, Charlène von Saher and Karen Levitov

Tickets: $45 series; $20 each lecture



Books in Focus
PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION
Sarah Houghteling

Thursday, March 26
6:30 pm

Free with Museum admission


Books in Focus
IN CONVERSATION: ARIEL SABAR AND SADIA SHEPARD
Moderator: Lucette Lagnado

Thursday, April 30
6:30 pm

Free with Museum admission


FAMILY PROGRAMS


STORYBOOK MONDAY – FANTASTIC VOYAGES

Monday, February 23
3:30 pm
Ages 3 to 5

Free with Museum admission


ART WORKSHOP AND GALLERY TOUR: COSTUMED CREATIONS!

Sunday, March 1
10:30 am
Ages 6 and up

Tickets: $12 per adult; $10 per child; $10 adult Jewish Museum family level member; $8 child Jewish Museum family level member


THEATER PERFORMANCES: PAPER BAG PLAYERS

Make a Little Room for Me!
Sundays, March 1 AND March 29
11:30 am AND 2 pm
Ages 4 and up

Tickets: $18 per adult; $13 per child; $15 adult Jewish Museum family level member; $11 child Jewish Museum family level member

SPECIAL OFFER: Costumed Creations Art Workshop plus a Paper Bag Players performance
$25 per adult; $18 per child; JM Family Member Prices; $18 adult Jewish Museum family level member; $13 child Jewish Museum family level member


FAMILY GALLERY TOUR – COSTUMES AND CLOTHING

Sunday, March 8
11:15 am
Ages 5 to 12

Free with Museum admission


CONCERT: DIRTY SOCK FUNTIME BAND

Sunday, March 8
2 pm
Ages 3 and up

Tickets: $15 per adult; $10 per child; $12 adult Jewish Museum family level member; $8 child Jewish Museum family level member


STORYBOOK MONDAY – COSTUMES AND CLOTHING

Monday, March 9
3:30 pm
Ages 3 to 5

Free with Museum admission


STORYBOOK MONDAY – EVERYDAY OBJECTS, EXTRAORDINARY ARTWORKS

Monday, March 23
3:30 pm
Ages 3 to 5

Free with Museum admission


GALLERY TOUR AND ART WORKSHOP – PAINTING FROM THE MASTERS

Sunday, April 5
10:30 am
Ages 3 to 9

Tickets: $12 per adult; $10 per child; $12 adult Jewish Museum family level member; $8 child Jewish Museum family level member


CONCERT: DAVID GROVER & THE BIG BEAR BAND

Sunday, April 5
2 pm
Ages 3 to 9

Tickets: $15 per adult; $10 per child; $12 adult Jewish Museum family level member; $8 child Jewish Museum family level member


MUSIC CLASSES: MUSIC FOR AARDVARKS AND OTHER MAMMALS

Mondays, April 6 to June 15
10 am – 10:45 am OR 11 am - 11:45 am
Ages 1 to 4

Registration fee: $355.00 per child; $325.00 Jewish Museum family member
Class size is limited – early registration is recommended.


FAMILY GALLERY TOUR – ON THE MOVE: JOURNEYS IN ART

Sunday, April 12
11:15 am
Ages 5 to 12

Free with Museum admission


PASSOVER ART FAIR

Sunday, April 12
12 noon - 4 pm
Ages 3 and up

Free with Museum admission


DROP IN ART WORKSHOP – PIECING TOGETHER PASSOVER

Monday and Tuesday, April 13 and 14
1 – 4 pm
Ages 4 and up

Free with Museum admission


STORYBOOK MONDAY – STORIES IN ART

Monday, April 13
3:30 pm
Ages 3 to 5

Free with Museum admission


STORYBOOK MONDAY – EARTH AND SKY

Monday, April 27
3:30 pm
Ages 3 to 5

Free with Museum admission


DROP IN ART WORKSHOP

Sundays through June 14
1 to 4 pm
Ages 3 and up

Free with Museum admission


STORYBOOK READINGS

Sundays through June 14
1:30 pm
Ages 2 to 6

Free with Museum admission


DRAW AND DISCOVER

Sundays through June 14
3:30 pm
Ages 5 to 12

Free with Museum admission


SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS


VERBAL IMAGING TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE BLIND OR PARTIALLY SIGHTED

Monday, March 2
1:15 pm

Tour of Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey.

Free with Museum admission


VERBAL IMAGING TEA TIME TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE BLIND OR PARTIALLY SIGHTED

Wednesday, March 4
2 pm

Tour of Chagall and the Artists of the Russian Jewish Theater, 1919-1949, followed by a light reception.

Free with Museum admission


SIGN LANGUAGE TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

Monday , March 9
12:15 pm

Tour of Chagall and the Artists of the Russian Jewish Theater, 1919-1949.

Free with Museum admission

SIGN LANGUAGE TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

Thursday, March 19
6:15 pm

Tour of Chagall and the Artists of the Russian Jewish Theater, 1919-1949.

Free with Museum admission


SIGN LANGUAGE TEA TIME TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

Wednesday, March 25
2 pm

Tea Time Tour of Reclaimed: Paintings from the Collection of Jacques Goudstikker, followed by a light reception.

Free with Museum admission


VERBAL IMAGING TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE BLIND OR PARTIALLY SIGHTED

Monday, April 6
1:15 pm

Tour of Reclaimed: Paintings from the Collection of Jacques Goudstikker.

Free with Museum admission



GENERAL INFORMATION



INFORMATION HOTLINE

To reach the Museum's offices, call: 212.423.3200.


ONLINE INFORMATION
http://www.thejewishmuseum.org


OTHER INFORMATION
Public and Family Programs 212.423.3337
The Jewish Museum's Cooper Shop 212.423.3211
Celebrations - The Jewish Museum Design Shop 212.423.3260


MUSEUM AND CAFÉ WEISSMAN HOURS
Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 11:00 am to 5:45 pm
Thursday 11:00 am to 8:00 pm
Friday CLOSED
CLOSED major legal and Jewish holidays
CAFÉ closes at 5:30 pm on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and at 7:30 pm Thursday. Café Weissman is closed on Friday and Saturday.


THE COOPER SHOP AND JEWISH MUSEUM DESIGN SHOP HOURS
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 11:00 am to 5:45 pm
Thursday 11:00 am to 8:00 pm
(Design Shop closes at 5:45 pm)
Friday 11:00 am to 3:00 pm
CLOSED Saturday and major legal and Jewish holidays


ADMISSION
Adults $12.00
Senior Citizens $10.00
Students $ 7.50
Children under 12 FREE
Jewish Museum Members FREE
Saturdays FREE


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