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Exhibition & Program Listings - January, February, March 2011Share

Press Contacts:
Anne Scher/Alex Wittenberg
The Jewish Museum
212.423.3271
pressoffice@thejm.org

EXHIBITION AND PROGRAM LISTINGS
January, February, March 2011


EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: This release contains information covering January, February and March 2011. You can view current and past press releases on our online press room at TheJewishMuseum.org/Pressroom. For images and additional press materials, please contact the Communications Office at 212.423.3271 or pressoffice@thejm.org. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE JEWISH MUSEUM’S HOURS HAVE CHANGED – SEE BELOW. NOW OPEN THURSDAY EVENINGS TILL 8 PM.

NEW EXHIBITIONS

MAIRA KALMAN: VARIOUS ILLUMINATIONS (OF A CRAZY WORLD)

March 11 through July 31, 2011

This first major museum survey of the work of illustrator, author and designer Maira Kalman features a selection spanning thirty years of 100 original paintings, drawings, and sketches shown along with the many ways Kalman's work has entered contemporary culture - in books and magazines, and on commercial products, from clothing to watches. Less widely seen works in photography, embroidery, textiles, and performance are also included. Kalman illuminates contemporary life with a profound sense of joy and unique sense of humor. As a context for this survey, Kalman has created a special installation to reveal some source material she has gathered as collector, walker, traveler, reader and maker of lists. Furnished with chairs, ladders and "many tables of many things," this installation offers a view of how she sees the world, both in and outside the studio. Maira Kalman: Various Illuminations (of a Crazy World) is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

PRESS PREVIEW
Tuesday, March 8
10 am – 1 pm


THE ART OF MATRIMONY: THIRTY SPLENDID MARRIAGE CONTRACTS FROM THE JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY LIBRARY

March 11 through June 26, 2011

One of the world's foremost collections of decorated Jewish marriage contracts (ketubbot) is held by The Library of The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City. Thirty of the finest will be on display at The Jewish Museum in The Art of Matrimony: Thirty Splendid Marriage Contracts from The Jewish Theological Seminary Library from March 11 through June 26, 2011. From one of the earliest known decorated pieces (twelfth century) to recent creations, these exquisite ketubbot provide a wealth of information on the artistic creativity, cultural interactions and social history of the communities in which they were created. Ketubbot, which typically record the bridegroom's obligations to his bride in case of death or divorce, have been integral to Jewish marriage for millennia. They were kept in the homes of married Jews, be they wealthy or poor, scholar or layman, living in the West under Christian governance or in the East under Muslim rule. The largest number of ketubbot in the Library's extraordinary collection are from Italy, where the art of the decorated ketubbah found its most beautiful expression during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries under the influence of Renaissance and Baroque art. Magnificent examples of Eastern marriage contracts from Egypt, Persia, Afghanistan and India, each absorbing the visual language of the surrounding culture, will also be on view. The marriage contracts in this exhibition represent the great diversity and range of Jewish settlement throughout history. They offer a fascinating look at the lives of individual couples, varied marriage customs, and the spread of artistic styles through commerce and trade.

PRESS PREVIEW
Tuesday, March 8
10 am – 1 pm


NEW MEDIA CENTER EXHIBITION

THE LINE AND THE CIRCLE BY SHARONE LIFSCHITZ

February 11 through August 21, 2011

In this video (19 min. 26 sec.), artist Sharone Lifschitz documents a two-week period she spent working with her mother in February 2009. Returning together to the darkroom for the first time in more than twenty years, mother and daughter printed fourteen images, selected by the artist and taken by her mother and other members of Kibbutz Nir Oz. The photographs, made between 1959 and the early 1980s, depict life in a community whose socialist values represent a particular moment in Israel's history. The printing of the images is itself an act of nostalgia, since digital photography has made such work almost obsolete. The process followed by the two women shapes a conversation through both content and ritual and the photographs become a catalyst for a new understanding to emerge--between parent and child, artist and artist, past and present. The video is a meditation on the vanishing space of the photographic darkroom and the demise of the utopia Lifschitz’s mother tried to create.


CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

SHIFTING THE GAZE: PAINTING AND FEMINISM

Through January 30, 2011

Feminist challenges to creative and institutional limits have been widely influential in art since the 1960s, with the emergence of the women’s art movement in the United States. Shifting the Gaze: Painting and Feminism is an exhibition exploring the impact of feminism on contemporary painting. Taking the visitor through a half-century of painting, the exhibition focuses on art at the crossroads of societal shift and individual expression. Shifting the Gaze places feminist art in a larger context exploring its roots in Abstract Expressionism, Pop and Minimalism, and extending to the present, when feminist impulses remain vital in recent works targeting the representation of women in popular culture. The exhibition, with over 30 paintings and several sculptures and decorative objects, is largely drawn from The Jewish Museum’s collection and also includes select loans. Works by 27 artists such as Judy Chicago, Louise Fishman, Leon Golub, Eva Hesse, Deborah Kass, Lee Krasner, Louise Nevelson, Elaine Reichek, Miriam Schapiro, Joan Snyder, Nancy Spero, and Hannah Wilke, among others, are arranged thematically. Seven works in Shifting the Gaze have been acquired over the last three years.


A HANUKKAH PROJECT: DANIEL LIBESKIND’S LINE OF FIRE
Through January 30, 2011

Daniel Libeskind, an international figure in architecture and urban design, has created a stunning installation featuring a selection of 40 Hanukkah lamps from the Museum’s renowned collection. Libeskind’s installation embodies his signature style: bold geometric forms, complex sight lines, and dynamic and often destabilizing interior spaces. The central focus of the installation is the Line of Fire, a jagged structure in brilliant red that diagonally bisects the gallery and serves as a pedestal for the Hanukkah lamps. The Line of Fire, a recurring feature in Libeskind’s work, symbolizes the continuity of Jewish existence through sudden changes in circumstances, some of them catastrophic. In this installation, it also represents the flames of the lamps kindled on the holiday, and the spiritual and regenerative power of fire. The selection of Hanukkah lamps on view will exemplify the diversity of the Museum’s collection, from an 18th century work made from the helmet shield of a Hessian soldier who fought in the American Revolution to Karim Rashid’s 2004 Menoramorph, made from neon green silicon.


HOUDINI: ART AND MAGIC
Through March 27, 2011

Born Ehrich Weiss in Budapest, Hungary, Harry Houdini (1874-1926), the renowned magician and escape artist, was the son of a rabbi who immigrated with his family to Wisconsin in 1878. Houdini was one of the 20th century’s most famous performers. His gripping theatrical presentations and heart-stopping outdoor spectacles attracted unprecedented crowds, and his talent for self-promotion and provocation captured headlines on both sides of the Atlantic. The Jewish Museum presents the first major art museum exhibition to examine Houdini’s life, legend, and enduring cultural influence. Through 160 objects, including 26 recent works of art inspired by Houdini, exhibition visitors are able to explore the career and legacy of the celebrated entertainer while considering his lasting impact on contemporary art and culture. Works in a variety of media by such artists as Matthew Barney, Jane Hammond, Vik Muniz, and Raymond Pettibon are on view along with historic photographs; dramatic Art Nouveau-era posters and broadsides; theater ephemera; and archival and silent films. Magic apparatus – rarely exhibited together – handcuffs, shackles, straitjacket, a milk can and a packing trunk will be showcased in the context of their original presentation. A recreation of the famous Water Torture Cell (much of the original was destroyed in a fire in 1995) is also on view. Two of Houdini’s private diaries, never before shown in a public exhibition, are displayed. Visitors learn about his evolution from a fledging circus performer in the 1890s, to a stage magician at the turn-of-the 20th century, to a daring escape artist in the early 1900s, and a world-famous celebrity who commanded a mass audience. Following its New York City showing, Houdini: Art and Magic will travel to Skirball Cultural Center, Los Angeles, CA (April 28 – September 4, 2011); Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA (September 30, 2011 – January 16, 2012); and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Madison, WI (February 11 – May 13, 2012).


MEDIA CENTER EXHIBITION

SHULIE: FILM AND STILLS BY ELISABETH SUBRIN

Through January 30, 2011

Shulie (1997) is a shot-by-shot remake of a little-known documentary about '60s feminist Shulamith Firestone. Author of the treatise The Dialectic of Sex: The Case for Feminist Revolution, Firestone as a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1967 when four male directors selected her as a subject for a film about the so-called Now Generation. Shot in the style of direct cinema, the original Shulie featured Firestone discussing religion, the limitations of motherhood, as well as racial and class issues in the workplace. Thirty years later, Elisabeth Subrin recreated Shulie using actors in many of the original locations. The resulting film is a nostalgic and somewhat cynical reflection on the legacy of second-wave feminism. Subrin writes, "in the compulsion to remake, to produce a fake document, to repeat a specific experience I never actually had, what I have offered up is the performance of a resonant, repetitive, emotional trauma that has yet to be healed." Shulie also features four new digital color photographs of enlarged film stills from Shulie, two of which are being shown for the first time. These photographs allow the viewer to focus on thematic details of the protagonist’s activities (commuting to work, creating art), as well as on formal details including 16mm film grain and video scanlines. Shulie is presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Shifting the Gaze: Painting and Feminism.


CHILDREN'S EXHIBITION

ARCHAEOLOGY ZONE: DISCOVERING TREASURES FROM PLAYGROUNDS TO PALACES


In Archaeology Zone: Discovering Treasures from Playgrounds to Palaces, an engaging and thoroughly interactive experience, children become archaeologists as they search for clues about ancient and modern objects. Visitors can discover what happens after archaeologists unearth artifacts and bring them back to their labs for in-depth analysis. Children ages 3 through 10 magnify, sketch and weigh objects from the past and the present, piece together clay fragments, interpret symbols, and dress in costumes. By examining these artifacts and imagining how people used these objects in their daily lives, children learn how forms have changed and evolved over time, and how these objects relate to their own lives.


MEDIA CENTER

THE BARBARA AND E. ROBERT GOODKIND MEDIA CENTER


The Barbara and E. Robert Goodkind Media Center features an exhibition space dedicated to video art and new media, and houses a digital library of 100 radio and television programs from The Jewish Museum’s National Jewish Archive of Broadcasting (NJAB). Selections include such comedy favorites as “How to Be a Jewish Son,” a panel discussion from a 1970 David Susskind Show featuring Mel Brooks; a 1947 radio drama entitled “Operation Nightmare” starring John Garfield and Al Jolson, produced by the United Jewish Appeal to call attention to displaced persons in postwar Europe; contemporary television documentaries on black-Jewish relations, Latino Jews, and klezmer music; interviews with artists such as Marc Chagall, Jacques Lipchitz, Larry Rivers, George Segal and Ben Shahn; and Manischewitz wine commercials produced between 1963 and 1981 featuring Sammy Davis, Jr. and Peter Lawford.

Episodes of such classic and contemporary television series such as Bridget Loves Bernie, Northern Exposure, The O.C., Seventh Heaven and Sports Night, as well as clips from The Colbert Report, feature interpretations of Jewish life-cycle events and holidays. A selection of musical performances includes a Hanukkah-themed video from the Latino-Jewish urban band Hip Hop Hoodios, an appearance by the Hasidic reggae star Matisyahu on The Late Show with David Letterman, a radio broadcast of liturgy composed by modern Zionist composer Marc Lavry, and a documentary on contemporary music featuring Frank London of The Klezmatics, Debbie Friedman, and Pharaoh's Daughter.


PERMANENT EXHIBITION

CULTURE AND CONTINUITY: THE JEWISH JOURNEY


One of the Museum’s newest acquisitions, Prayer Synagogue, Gonder Ethiopia; Prayer at the Vatican, Rome Italy; Prayer 9/11, New York, USA, a large-scale photographic triptych by Moroccan artist Touhami Ennadre, will be on view in the contemporary gallery of Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey beginning February 20, 2011. The one work with three parts depicts three sets of praying figures - a pair of Ethiopian Jews, a Christian man at the Vatican after the death of Pope John Paul II, and a Muslim woman praying in New York just after the attacks of September 11, 2001. These photographs will join works from the Museum’s collection by artists including Chantal Akerman, Anni Albers, Jacob El Hanani, and Patrick Faigenbaum. The selected artworks address the question of what it means to make religious art in a secular age. They show the persistence of faith and spirituality in contemporary art where ideas about the virtues of aesthetic contemplation and the process of artistic creation have often supplanted direct religious references.

Three major sculptural installations related to Hanukkah will be on view in the contemporary gallery of Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey through January 30, 2011. Alice Aycock’s Greased Lightning (1984) is a motorized kinetic sculpture featuring an oversized moving dreidel, the small, inscribed top that children play with during the holiday. Miracle (2004) by Lynn Godley is a playful and monumental Hanukkah lamp that uses multiple lights to evoke the cumulative effect of progressively lighting the candles over 8 nights. Matthew McCaslin’s Bring the Light (2000) fashions metal electrical conduit, light switches and porcelain light fixtures into an innovative and decidedly nontraditional Hanukkah lamp. In addition, a selection from Eleanor Antin’s video Vilna Nights, a photograph by Mike Mandel entitled Robot Lights the Chanukah Candles, and works on paper by Larry Rivers and Marc Alan Jacobs will be included. These works are presented in conjunction with the exhibition, A Hanukkah Project: Daniel Libeskind’s Line of Fire.

A recent acquisition, Portrait of Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, 1842, by 19th century German artist Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, has been added to the "Modernity" section of Culture and Continuity. The subject of this portrait was the sister of famous composer Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, a talented composer and musician in her own right. Fanny Hensel was the wife of a fellow painter, Wilhelm Hensel, whom Oppenheim met in Rome with the Nazarenes. Oppenheim, widely recognized as a portraitist, is known as the first Jewish artist to have benefited from the Emancipation, when new civil rights permitted Jews entry into academies of art for the first time in Europe. Extensively patronized by the Frankfurt branch of the Rothschild family, Oppenheim characterized himself (immodestly) as "a painter to the Rothschilds and the Rothschild of painters."

Comprised of close to 800 works, this vibrant, two-floor exhibition examines the Jewish experience as it has evolved from antiquity to the present over 4,000 years. Visitors to the 4th floor see the Ancient World galleries, featuring archaeological objects representing Jewish life in Israel and the Mediterranean region from 1200 BCE to 640 CE, and a dazzling installation of selections from the Museum’s renowned collection of Hanukkah lamps. On the 3rd floor alone close to 400 works from the 16th century to the present are on view in this dramatic and evocative experience.

Other highlights of Culture and Continuity include: a pair of silver Torah finials from Breslau, Germany (1792-93) reunited at The Jewish Museum after sixty years of separation; paintings by such artists as Marc Chagall, Max Weber, Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, Isidor Kaufmann, Morris Louis, and Ken Aptekar; prints by El Lissitzky; sculpture by Elie Nadelman, and George Segal’s monumental sculpture, The Holocaust, 1982. A display of 38 Torah ornaments allows the viewer to compare artistic styles from different parts of the world. It features lavishly decorated Torah crowns, pointers, finials and shields from Afghanistan, Algeria, Austria, England, France, Germany, Holland, Hungary, Ottoman Empire (Greece and Turkey), Georgia (of the former Soviet Union), Morocco, Israel, Italy, early 20th century Palestine, Persia, Poland, Russia, Tunisia, the United States, and Yemen.

A suite of classic post-World War II works originally designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson and the prominent Abstract Expressionist sculptor Ibram Lassaw for Congregation Kneses Tifereth Israel in Port Chester, New York, is also on view in Culture and Continuity. Included are sections of a large wall sculpture/bimah screen, the eternal lamp, the Torah ark, and two of the four bimah chairs.

Television excerpts from the Museum’s National Jewish Archive of Broadcasting are also included. The entire exhibition is accompanied by a series of thematic, random access audio guides using MP3 technology, including a Director’s Highlights Tour with The Jewish Museum’s Director Joan Rosenbaum and WNYC Radio’s Brian Lehrer.


TWENTIETH ANNUAL NEW YORK JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL


The Jewish Museum and the Film Society of Lincoln Center are presenting the 20th annual New York Jewish Film Festival at the Film Society’s Walter Reade Theater, The Jewish Museum, and The JCC in Manhattan, Jan. 12-27, 2011. The festival’s 36 features and shorts from 14 countries—31 screening in their world, U.S. or New York premieres—provide a diverse global perspective on the Jewish experience. In celebration of the festival’s 20th anniversary, several film screenings will be followed by filmmakers and special guests in onstage discussions and/or performances. A complete schedule of films is available at www.thejewishmuseum.org or The Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Web site, www.filmlinc.com.


PUBLIC PROGRAMS


Lecture
ODESSA: GENIUS AND DEATH IN A CITY OF DREAMS
Charles King

Monday, February 28
11:30 am

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 Jewish Museum members


Lecture
WE ARE IN A GOLDEN AGE OF JEWISH AMERICAN ART AND WE DON’T REALLY KNOW IT
Matthew Baigell

Monday, March 7
11:30 am

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 Jewish Museum members


Lecture
PICTURING VISHNIAC: RE-EXAMINING THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF ROMAN VISHNIAC
Maya Benton

Thursday, March 10
6:30 pm

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 students/over 65; $10 Jewish Museum members


Lectures
IN FOCUS: KETUBBOT
Mondays, March 14, 21
11:30 am

March 14
The Ketubbah in History
Dr. David Kraemer


March 21
Celebration and Commitment: The Art and History of Decorated Ketubbot
Sharon Liberman Mintz

Tickets: $35 – both lectures, general public; $20 – single lecture, general public; $30 – both lectures, Jewish Museum members; $18 – single lecture, Jewish Museum members


FAMILY PROGRAMS


MUSIC CLASSES: DIRTY SOCKS MUSIC ROMPS
Ages 1 to 4
Tuesdays, January 25 – March 29
10 am – 10:45 am OR 11 am - 11:45 am

Registration fee: $365.00 per child; $335.00 Jewish Museum family member
Class size is limited – early registration is recommended.


MUSICAL THEATER PERFORMANCE: PASTA!
Ages 2 to 7
A POP UPS PUPPET MUSICAL
Sunday, February 6
2 pm

Tickets: $16 per adult; $11 per child; $13 adult Jewish Museum family level member;
$9 child Jewish Museum family level member


VACATION WEEK ARTS AND CRAFTS:
Age 4 and up
MAKING MAGIC À LA HOUDINI
February 21, 22, and 24
1 – 4 pm

Free with Museum admission


MAGIC WORKSHOP: MAD FOR MAGIC WITH RYAN OAKES
Ages 8 to 12
Sunday, February 27
10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Tickets: $12 per adult; $10 per child; $10 adult Jewish Museum family level member;
$8 child Jewish Museum family level member


CONCERT: TIMBALOOLOO WITH ORAN ETKIN
Ages 2 to 7
Sunday, March 6
2 pm

Tickets: $16 per adult; $11 per child; $13 adult Jewish Museum family level member; $9 child Jewish Museum family level member


CONCERT: THE DIRTY SOCK FUNTIME BAND
Age 3 and up
Sunday, March 20
11:30 and 2 pm

Tickets: $16 per adult; $11 per child; $13 adult Jewish Museum family level member;
$9 child Jewish Museum family level member


DROP-IN ART WORKSHOP
Age 3 and up
Sundays through June 12
12 noon – 4 pm

Free with Museum admission


STORYBOOKS AND ART
Ages 3 to 7
Sundays through June 12
1:15 pm
Storytelling and gallery activities

Free with Museum admission


SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAM


SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETED TEA TIME TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

Monday, March 14
2 pm

Tea Time Tour of Houdini: Art and Magic, followed by a light reception.

Free with Museum admission


GENERAL INFORMATION


INFORMATION HOTLINE:

To reach the Museum's offices, call: 212.423.3200.


ONLINE INFORMATION:
http://www.thejewishmuseum.org


OTHER INFORMATION:
Public and Family Programs 212.423.3337
The Jewish Museum's Cooper Shop 212.423.3211
Celebrations - The Jewish Museum Design Shop 212.423.3260


NEW MUSEUM HOURS:
Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday 11:00 am to 5:45 pm
Thursday 11:00 am to 8:00 pm
Friday 11:00 am to 4:00 pm
Wednesday CLOSED
CLOSED major legal and Jewish holidays
NOTE: The children’s exhibition, Archaeology Zone: Discovering Treasures from Playgrounds to Palaces, is open Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday (not on Saturday).


NEW COOPER SHOP AND JEWISH MUSEUM DESIGN SHOP HOURS:

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 am to 5:45 pm
Wednesday 11:00 am to 3:00 pm
Thursday 11:00 am to 8:00 pm
Friday 11:00 am to 4:00 pm
CLOSED Saturday and major legal and Jewish holidays


ADMISSION
Adults $12.00
Senior Citizens $10.00
Students $ 7.50
Children under 12 FREE
Jewish Museum Members FREE
Saturdays FREE


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