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After Rabin: New Art from Israel

September 13, 1998 - January 3, 1999

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Adi Nes
Untitled, 1996
Color photograph
Lent by the artist, Tel Aviv

Placing Israeli soldiers in ambiguous and disorienting contexts, these fully staged photographs debunk stereotypes of masculinity and male camaraderie.



Uri Katzenstein
Love Dub, 1994-95
Oil on bronze
Lent by Givon Art Gallery Ltd., Tel Aviv>/p>


In order to create a new family for himself, the artist made a group of figures that carry his face but are smaller than human scale. He creates secret and impossible goals for these figures to perform, suggesting the ironic outcome of events, even heroic national achievements.




Gilad Ophir
From the Necropolis series, 1996
Gelatin silver print
Lent by the artist, courtesy Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv

Gilad Ophir’s photographs depict two of the thousands of bullet-ridden Mercedes jeeps captured by the Israeli army from the Egyptians and the Jordanians. They were later used for target practice.



Limbus Group
Embroideries of Generals, 1997
Digital print on canvas
Lent by the artists, Tel Aviv

By displaying portraits of Chiefs of Staff of the Israeli Army printed on needlepoint canvas, a domestic material associated with women’s crafts, Embroideries of Generals undermines the myth of the Israeli war hero.




Uri Tzaig
Forest - Postcard Rack, 1995
Postcards and postcard rack
Lent by the artist, Tel Aviv

The artist's aim is to break familiar modes of perception and introduce an open interpretation in their place. The digitized portions of the forest call our attention to the impending danger hidden behind the trees.




Lea Nikel
Gesture for Rabin and for Peace, 1995
Acrylic on canvas
Lent by the artist, Moshav Kidron




Nurit David
Buba and Thistle, 1997
Oil on canvas
Lent by Givon Art Gallery Ltd., Tel Aviv

The artist's autobiographical narratives are filled with psychological and iconographic images that represent the phases and changes in her life. She often locates her figures within a stairway, a transitional space in which the story of her family unfolds. Her characters are manipulated like puppets, alluding to the individual who can – or cannot – be taken apart and put back together.


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1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York NY 10128

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