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Exhibition & Program Listings - April, May, June 2012Share

Press Contacts:
Anne Scher/Alex Wittenberg
The Jewish Museum
212.423.3271
pressoffice@thejm.org

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: This release contains information covering April, May and June 2012. You can view current and past press releases online at TheJewishMuseum.org/Pressroom. For images and additional press materials, please contact the Communications Office at 212.423.3271 or pressoffice@thejm.org. The Jewish Museum's galleries, shops and café will be closed on Saturday and Sunday, April 7 and 8, and Friday and Saturday, April 13 and 14 in observance of Passover; and Sunday and Monday, May 27 and 28 in observance of Shavuot. The 34th annual Museum Mile Festival takes place on Tuesday, June 12 from 6 to 9 pm.


NEW EXHIBITION

EDOUARD VUILLARD: A PAINTER AND HIS MUSES, 1890-1940

May 4 through September 23, 2012

The art of Edouard Vuillard (1868-1940) - a painter who began his career as a member of the Nabi group of avant-garde artists in Paris in the 1890s - will be celebrated at The Jewish Museum in the first major one-person, New York exhibition of the French artist's work in over twenty years. Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 will include more than 50 paintings as well as a selection of prints, photographs and documents exploring the crucial role played by the patrons, dealers and muses who comprised Vuillard's circle. The exhibition will examine the prominence of key players in the cultural milieu of modern Paris, many of them Jewish, and their influence on Vuillard's professional and private life. Vuillard's continuing significance from the turn of the 20th century to the onset of World War II will also be explored. Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 brings together works from public and private collections in the U.S. and Europe. A quarter of the paintings have never been exhibited publicly in America before. Vuillard's career spans fifty years. During his lifetime, Paris was the capital of the international avant-garde, the laboratory of new styles in art, music, poetry, and prose. Vuillard had unusually close and sustained relationships with his patrons; some became intimate and lifelong friends. In this glittering cultural milieu he became romantically involved with two fascinating women, Misia Natanson and Lucy Hessel, each of whom served as both patron and muse. Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 traces the entire arc of Vuillard's career, in which he pursued painterly experimentation in color, media, and ambience, especially in portraiture. Vuillard's late portraits are a revelation - among the great examples in the twentieth century and of dazzling virtuosity. Experimental, yet deeply committed to the old masters throughout his life, Vuillard maintained a continual tension in his work between tradition and modernism.


NEW MEDIA CENTER EXHIBITION

SANFORD BIGGERS AND JENNIFER ZACKIN: A SMALL WORLD . . .

March 30 through August 26, 2012

The video installation, Sanford Biggers and Jennifer Zackin: a small world..., is on view in the Museum's Barbara and E. Robert Goodkind Media Center. Inthis video (1999-2001, 6 min. 30 sec.), Sanford Biggers and Jennifer Zackin juxtapose home movies of their families - one African American and one Jewish American - to explore the commonalities of middle-class life across racial lines. The silent footage was shot during the childhood of the artists in the 1970s, Biggers in California and Zackin in New York. The similarities in both family narratives are striking, and the tone is playful. The Biggerses and the Zackins celebrate birthdays, travel to Disneyland, and entertain at indoor and outdoor gatherings. Yet the split screen sets up two clearly delineated and nonintersecting worlds - black America and white America. As a whole, the artwork leaves open the question of whether a bridge exists between these two universes.


CONTINUING EXHIBITION

KEHINDE WILEY/THE WORLD STAGE: ISRAEL

Through July 29, 2012

The Jewish Museum is presenting Kehinde Wiley/The World Stage: Israel, featuring 14 large-scale paintings from the contemporary American painter Kehinde Wiley's newest series, The World Stage: Israel. The vibrant portraits of Israeli youths from diverse ethnic and religious affiliations are each embedded in a unique background influenced by Jewish ceremonial art. Also included are 11 works - papercuts and large textiles - chosen by the artist from The Jewish Museum's collection. All of the 14 paintings on view are being displayed in New York for the first time. A new acquisition by Wiley (born 1977, Los Angeles) served as impetus for the exhibition. The painting, Alios Itzhak (2011), is a nine-foot tall portrait of a young Jewish Ethiopian-Israeli man surrounded by an intricate decorative background inspired by a traditional Jewish papercut in the Museum's collection. Wiley says his appropriated decorative backgrounds serve as catalysts for his paintings. The paintings represent a unique fusion of contemporary culture with European traditions and those of North Africa and the Middle East. Roughly two-thirds of the portraits in the Israel series are of Ethiopian Jews, others are of native-born Jews and Arab Israelis. The artist is driven by an ongoing exploration of globalization, diasporas, cultural hybridity, and power. Saying he knows what it feels like to exist on the periphery, Wiley likes to catapult often powerless, anonymous young men of color onto enormous canvases and into the visual language of the powerful. The large size of the paintings reflects Wiley's observation that scale has been used as a measure of historical importance throughout art history


CONTINUING LOBBY DISPLAY

NO TREE NO BRANCH BY LAWRENCE WEINER

Through May 13, 2012

The Jewish Museum has put on display in its lobby a new work by Lawrence Weiner, NO TREE NO BRANCH (2011/12). This large-scale drawing, presented directly on the museum wall in adhesive vinyl, is on public view in New York for the first time. The drawing is part of a series Weiner began in 2011; an electronic version of NO TREE NO BRANCH can be seen on the website of Documenta 13. Weiner has re-worked an original Yiddish saying, "All the Stars in the Sky Have the Same Face" into Hebrew, English and Arabic, using the three languages to transform an originally isolationist "them/us" adage into an inclusive, non-hierarchical statement outlining one of the foremost precepts of peace. The sayings are arranged to break a circle, along with the words, NO TREE and NO BRANCH. Another text, in the center of the broken circle, reads AN OLIVE TREE IS AN OLIVE TREE FOR ALL THAT. These simple statement/icons can be seen as plain unambiguous shapes. Yet, arranged together, they also bear deep symbolic meaning - the olive branch of peace, the tree of life, and the representation of movement with curvilinear lines to express simultaneity. The artist considers this work his "contribution to the dialogue."


CHILDREN'S EXHIBITION

ARCHAEOLOGY ZONE: DISCOVERING TREASURES FROM PLAYGROUNDS TO PALACES


In Archaeology Zone: Discovering Treasures from Playgrounds to Palaces, an engaging and thoroughly interactive experience, children become archaeologists as they search for clues about ancient and modern objects. Visitors can discover what happens after archaeologists unearth artifacts and bring them back to their labs for in-depth analysis. Children ages 3 through 10 magnify, sketch and weigh objects from the past and the present, piece together clay fragments, interpret symbols, and dress in costumes. By examining these artifacts and imagining how people used these objects in their daily lives, children learn how forms have changed and evolved over time, and how these objects relate to their own lives.


MEDIA CENTER

THE BARBARA AND E. ROBERT GOODKIND MEDIA CENTER


The Barbara and E. Robert Goodkind Media Center features an exhibition space dedicated to video art and new media, and houses a digital library of 100 radio and television programs from The Jewish Museum’s National Jewish Archive of Broadcasting (NJAB). Selections include such comedy favorites as “How to Be a Jewish Son,” a panel discussion from a 1970 David Susskind Show featuring Mel Brooks; a 1947 radio drama entitled “Operation Nightmare” starring John Garfield and Al Jolson, produced by the United Jewish Appeal to call attention to displaced persons in postwar Europe; contemporary television documentaries on black-Jewish relations, Latino Jews, and klezmer music; interviews with artists such as Marc Chagall, Jacques Lipchitz, Larry Rivers, George Segal and Ben Shahn; and Manischewitz wine commercials produced between 1963 and 1981 featuring Sammy Davis, Jr. and Peter Lawford.

Episodes of such classic and contemporary television series such as Bridget Loves Bernie, Northern Exposure, The O.C., Seventh Heaven and Sports Night, as well as clips from The Colbert Report, feature interpretations of Jewish life-cycle events and holidays. A selection of musical performances includes a Hanukkah-themed video from the Latino-Jewish urban band Hip Hop Hoodios, an appearance by the Hasidic reggae star Matisyahu on The Late Show with David Letterman, a radio broadcast of liturgy composed by modern Zionist composer Marc Lavry, and a documentary on contemporary music featuring Frank London of The Klezmatics, Debbie Friedman, and Pharaoh's Daughter.


PERMANENT EXHIBITION

CULTURE AND CONTINUITY: THE JEWISH JOURNEY –
NEW INSTALLATION OF CONTEMPORARY WORKS


Composed: Identity, Politics, Sex, a selection of photo-based works by seven contemporary artists, is on view at The Jewish Museum in the final gallery of Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey through June 30, 2012. Using conventional forms of photography - including traditional portraiture, photojournalism, and online profile pictures - the artists explore overlapping national, ethnic, and sexual identities. The selected artworks engage and play with conventions of art history and forms of popular culture to focus attention on contradictions of identity and desire. Artists represented include: Marc Adelman, Gloria Bornstein, AA Bronson, Debbie Grossman, Adi Nes, Collier Schorr, and Rona Yefman.

Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey is comprised of close to 800 works. This vibrant, two-floor exhibition examines the Jewish experience as it has evolved from antiquity to the present over 4,000 years. Visitors to the 4th floor see the Ancient World galleries, featuring archaeological objects representing Jewish life in Israel and the Mediterranean region from 1200 BCE to 640 CE, and a dazzling installation of selections from the Museum's renowned collection of Hanukkah lamps. On the 3rd floor alone close to 400 works from the 16th century to the present are on view in this dramatic and evocative experience.

Portrait of Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, 1842, by 19th century German artist Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, has been added to the "Modernity" section of Culture and Continuity. The subject of this portrait was the sister of famous composer Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, a talented composer and musician in her own right. Fanny Hensel was the wife of a fellow painter, Wilhelm Hensel, whom Oppenheim met in Rome with the Nazarenes.Oppenheim, widely recognized as a portraitist, is known as the first Jewish artist to have benefited from the Emancipation, when new civil rights permitted Jews entry into academies of art for the first time in Europe. Extensively patronized by the Frankfurt branch of the Rothschild family, Oppenheim characterized himself (immodestly) as "a painter to the Rothschilds and the Rothschild of painters."

Other highlights of Culture and Continuity include: a pair of silver Torah finials from Breslau, Germany (1792-93) reunited at The Jewish Museum after sixty years of separation; paintings by such artists as Marc Chagall, Max Weber, Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, Isidor Kaufmann, Morris Louis, and Ken Aptekar; prints by El Lissitzky; and a sculpture by Elie Nadelman. A display of 36 Torah ornaments allows the viewer to compare artistic styles from different parts of the world. It features lavishly decorated Torah crowns, pointers, finials and shields from Afghanistan, Algeria, Austria, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Ottoman Empire (Greece and Turkey), Georgia (of the former Soviet Union), Morocco, Israel, Italy, The Netherlands, Persia, Poland, Russia, Tunisia, the United States, and Yemen.

A suite of classic post-World War II works originally designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson and the prominent Abstract Expressionist sculptor Ibram Lassaw for Congregation Kneses Tifereth Israel in Port Chester, New York, is also on view in Culture and Continuity. Included are sections of a large wall sculpture/bimah screen, the eternal lamp, the Torah ark, and two of the four bimah chairs.

Television excerpts from the Museum's National Jewish Archive of Broadcasting are also included. The entire exhibition is accompanied by a series of thematic, random access audio guides using MP3 technology.


PUBLIC PROGRAMS


Artist Talk
GAY BLOCK IN CONVERSATION WITH DAPHNE MERKIN
Thursday, April 26
6:30 pm

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 students/over 65; $10 Jewish Museum members


Lecture
THE LIST WITH MARTIN FLETCHER
Monday, April 30
11:30 am

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 students/over 65; $10 Jewish Museum members


Lecture Series
EDOUARD VUILLARD: A PAINTER AND HIS MUSES, 1890-1940
Mondays, May 7 and 21, June 4
11:30 am

May 7: Vuillard in Turn-of-the-Century France
Jane Becker


May 21: Edouard Vuillard: From the Interiors of Montemarte to The League of Nations
Jane Becker


June 4: Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940
Stephen Brown

Tickets: $45 - series, general public; $20 - single lecture, general public; $40 - series, Jewish Museum members; $18 - single lecture, Jewish Museum members



Artist Talk
LISA YUSKAVAGE IN CONVERSATION WITH NORMAN KLEEBLATT
Thursday, May 24
6:30 pm

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 students/over 65; $10 Jewish Museum members


Artist Talk
VUILLARD: DECORATIVE PAINTINGS AND HIDDEN PORTRAITS
Gloria Groom

Thursday, May 31
6:30 pm

Tickets: $15 general public; $12 students/over 65; $10 Jewish Museum members


FAMILY PROGRAMS


VACATION WEEK ART WORKSHOP: PICTURING PASSOVER WITH PAINTING

April 9, 10 and 12, 1 - 4 pm
Age 4 and up

Free with Museum admission


MUSIC CLASSES: DIRTY SOCKS MUSIC ROMPS

Tuesdays, April 10 - June 12
10 am - 10:45 am
Ages 1 to 4

Registration fee: $375.00 per child; $345.00 Jewish Museum family member
Class size is limited - early registration is recommended.


ART WORKSHOP AND GALLERY TOUR FOR KIDS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Sunday, April 29
10:30 am - Noon
Ages 5 to 17

Free with Museum admission. Space is limited - the public may call 212.423.3256 to register.


CONCERT: TIMBALOOLOO WITH ORAN ETKIN

Sunday, May 6
2 pm
Ages 2 to 7

Tickets: $16 per adult; $11 per child; $13 adult Jewish Museum family level
member; $9 child Jewish Museum family level member


POWER TO THE PORTRAIT FAMILY DAY

Sunday, May 20
Noon - 4 pm
Age 3 and up

Free with Museum admission


DROP-IN ART WORKSHOP

Sundays through June 10
Noon - 4 pm
Age 3 and up

Free with Museum admission


STORYBOOKS AND ART

Sundays through June 10
1:15 pm
Ages 3 to 7

Storytelling and gallery activities

Free with Museum admission


SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS


VERBAL IMAGING TEA TIME TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE BLIND OR PARTIALLY SIGHTED

Monday, May 21
2 pm

Tea Time Tour of Kehinde Wiley/The World Stage: Israel, followed by a light refreshments.

Free with Museum admission


SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETED TEA TIME TOUR FOR VISITORS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

Monday, June 11
2 pm

Tea Time Tour of Kehinde Wiley/The World Stage: Israel, followed by light refreshments.

Free with Museum admission



GENERAL INFORMATION

INFORMATION HOTLINE:

To reach the Museum's offices, call: 212.423.3200.


ONLINE INFORMATION:
http://www.thejewishmuseum.org


OTHER INFORMATION:
Public and Family Programs - 212.423.3337
The Jewish Museum's Cooper Shop - 212.423.3211
Celebrations - The Jewish Museum Design Shop - 212.423.3260


MUSEUM HOURS:
Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday - 11:00 am to 5:45 pm
Thursday - 11:00 am to 8:00 pm
Friday - 11:00 am to 4:00 pm
Wednesday – CLOSED
CLOSED major legal and Jewish holidays
NOTE: The children’s exhibition, Archaeology Zone: Discovering Treasures from Playgrounds to Palaces, is open Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday (not on Saturday).


COOPER SHOP AND JEWISH MUSEUM DESIGN SHOP HOURS:

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday - 11:00 am to 5:45 pm
Wednesday - 11:00 am to 3:00 pm
Thursday - 11:00 am to 8:00 pm
Friday - 11:00 am to 4:00 pm
CLOSED Saturday and major legal and Jewish holidays


ADMISSION:
Adults - $12.00
Senior Citizens - $10.00
Students - $ 7.50
Children under 12 - FREE
Jewish Museum Members - FREE
Saturdays – FREE


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