Skip Navigation

Related Works of ArtShare

Purim Noisemaker

Purim Noisemaker

Poland, 1933
  • Wood: carved and incised
  • 8 1/2 x 6 3/4 x 3 1/8 in. (21.6 x 17.1 x 8 cm)
  • The Jewish Museum, New York
  • The Rose and Benjamin Mintz Collection, M 424
On view

Larger Image

close

Purim Noisemaker

close

close

Listen


This small, roughly carved wooden noisemaker creates a noise by alternately striking the heads of Adolf Hitler and Haman. Made in Poland in 1933, it foreshadows the devastating events that occurred in Europe over the following decade. The noisemaker was owned by Benjamin Mintz, a Warsaw collector who brought a group of Jewish artifacts to New York in 1939 to exhibit at the World's Fair. Shortly after, Hitler invaded Poland, so Mintz and his wife remained in the United States. Mrs. Mintz sold the Judaica collection to The Jewish Museum in 1947.

This noisemaker reflects the tradition of identifying contemporary oppressors with the biblical character of Haman.

Discuss with students:

  • Describe this noisemaker. How is it different from other noisemakers you have seen?

  • When you flip the noisemaker back and forth, it hits Haman and Hitler on the head. What do you think the maker of this object was saying by putting the heads of these men on it?


Purim Set

Purim Set

Purim Kit 2000

Laurel J. Robinson (American, b. 1952) Phillip Taylor
Americus, Georgia, United States, 2000
  • Wood: burned, painted; glass; brass; printed paper
  • 18 7/8 x 11 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (47.9 x 29.2 x 8.9 cm)
  • The Jewish Museum, New York
  • Purchase: Dr. Joel and Phyllis Gitlin Judaica Acquisitions Fund, 2002-55
Not on view

Larger Image

close

Purim Set

Purim Kit 2000

close

Purim Kit 2000


Laurel J. Robinson's Purim Kit 2000 includes a several items intended to help recount and celebrate the Purim story--a mask, a flask, and a Scroll of Esther. The double-sided mask features King Ahasuerus on one side and Queen Esther on the other. It is traditional for adults to drink on Purim (until one no longer knows the difference between "blessed be Mordecai" and "cursed be Haman"), so Robinson's kit includes a flask. Shaped like a woman's leg, it represents Esther's royal predecessor, Queen Vashti, who appears to be kicking her husband in the face.

Discuss with students:

  • What objects are included in Laurel Robinson's Purim Kit?

  • What would you put in a Purim kit? What would you include in a Rosh Hashanah or Hanukkah kit? What about a birthday kit or Fourth-of-July kit?