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New York Jewish Film Festival 2011

January 12, 2011 - January 27, 2011

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US Premiere: 9 film(s)
8 Stories That Haven’t Changed the World
Cabaret Polska
Convoys of Shame / Les Convois de la honte
Eichmann’s End: Love, Betrayal, Death
Inventory
My Father / Récits de sam
Quentin and Ferdinand
Romeo and Juliet in Yiddish
Singing in the Dark



Cabaret Polska
Nir David Zats & Zuzanna Solakiewicz | Poland | 2008 | 49mm
U.S. Premiere
An unusual take on the effects of the 1968 anti-Semitic campaign in Poland. Combining documentary with animation and cabaret performance, the film considers these events and their aftermath through personal memories touching on food, language, politics and song. A troupe of revelers, a puppet of then-Communist leader, Gomu?ka, and a hungry secret police agent round out the cast of characters.
Zuzanna Solakiewicz, co-director, will be in attendance.

preceded by


8 Stories That Haven’t Changed the World
Ivo Krankowski & Jan Špiewak | Poland | 2010 | 35mm
U.S. Premiere
The Polish Jewish Youth Organization presents this engaging documentary on the childhood memories of eight Polish Jews born before WWII. They recall with vivid intensity memories ranging from their first days at school, the first books they read and their first loves.
Ivo Krankowski, co-director, and Jan Špiewak, co-director, will be in attendance.
Wed Jan 19: 1:30pm
Wed Jan 19: 6:00pm



Convoys of Shame / Les Convois de la honte
Raphaël Delpard | France | 2010 | 109mm
U.S. Premiere
This incisive documentary examines how the SNCF (the French national rail company) used its trains and its extensive infrastructure to transport tens of thousands of Jews, Roma, and members of the resistance from France to Nazi concentration camps from 1940 to 1944. Accounts from eyewitnesses, historians, and attorneys are supplemented by elegant reconstitutions. Also examined is the creation of an exaggerated myth of resistance among railroad workers.
Mon Jan 24: 1:00pm
Mon Jan 24: 6:00pm



Eichmann’s End: Love, Betrayal, Death
Raymond Ley | Germany/Israel | 2010 | 90mm
U.S. Premiere
This brilliantly constructed film tells the story leading up to the capture of Adolph Eichmann by Mossad agents in Argentina. Interwoven with testimonials of people involved in the events are high-end dramatic scenarios. At the heart of the film is the unbelievable yet true story of a love affair between a Holocaust survivor’s daughter and the boy she did not realize was Eichmann’s son. Ulrich Tukur stars as the German journalist interviewing Eichmann in Argentina before his capture.
Mon Jan 17: 6:00pm
Sun Jan 23: 4:00pm



Romeo and Juliet in Yiddish
Eve Annenberg | USA | 2010 | 91mm
U.S. Premiere
A middle-aged ER nurse—and bitterly lapsed observant Jew—undertakes a Yiddish translation of Shakespeare’s great classic. Meanwhile, her houseguest, also a Hasidic dropout, is “leaking” Kabbalistic magic, and enchants her studio apartment. In what might be the first Yiddish “mumblecore” film, Annenberg creates a parallel universe (aka Williamsburg, Brooklyn), where Romeo and Juliet stem from divergent streams of ultra-orthodox Judaism and speak their lines in street-smart Yiddish.
Eve Annenberg, director, and members of the cast and crew will be in attendance.

preceded by


Seltzer Works
Jessica Edwards | USA | 2010 | 7mm
In the early 1900s, thousands of seltzer deliverymen shlepped heavy glass bottles full of fizzy water to millions of thirsty customers. In this short documentary, the last bottler in Brooklyn fends off the supermarket seltzer take-over and honors the drink’s place in history.
Jessica Edwards, director, will be in attendance at Jan 16 screening.
Sun Jan 16: 9:00pm
Wed Jan 26: 1:15pm



Singing in the Dark
Max Nosseck | USA | 1956 | 86mm
U.S. Premiere of Restored Print
The incomparable Moishe Oysher plays Leo, a German concentration camp survivor suffering from traumatic amnesia. He works as a hotel clerk next to a nightclub where he is befriended by comedian Joey Napoleon (played by borscht-belter Joey Adams). Gradually his memory is restored with the help of Napoleon, some gangsters, a psychiatrist and the love of a good woman. One of the first American-made feature films to dramatize the Holocaust, this fascinating film was Oysher’s only English-language film, and was shot by Oscar-winning cinematographer Boris Kaufman (On the Waterfront, 12 Angry Men).
Sharon Rivo, executive director of National Center for Jewish Film, will be in attendance.
Sun Jan 23: 1:30pm



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